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the former governor championed centrist principles and got away with it. he keeps this act up. michael steele is a former rare of the rnc as well as an msnbc political analyst and cynthia tucker is a syndicated columnist. thank you. michael, there's on old tradition in politics, you go to your fringe or hard left or hard right to win the primaries and caucuses and then you start to move slowly so boy labor day you're ready to confront the enemy at the center. he didn't do it like that. he stayed right all the way through the summer and maybe masterfully wednesday decided to go with i'm for the 100%. i'm for pre-existing condition coverage, for all this education, all this good stuff. >> i think part of that -- you're right in your anam sis, that's exactly what happens politically. i think for the romney campaign they took that strategy, elongated it because they had some shoring up to do with their base. >> can he pull it off? can you make that kind of switcheroo in september? >> i think you can, number one. >> october. >> september/october. i think you can, number one. number two, we saw oba
of the debate. in 1988, michael dukakis could have had help not looking so cold in his response. >> we have a professor at the george washington university, john sides. when you have those moments that reinforce, either good or for ill, to a candidate, how important or damaging can these be? >> candidate debates in a general election to not move the polls a lot. only in a close race. in general, i think these dramatic moments in debates are not necessarily game changes for the average american voter. >> you wrote, usually the candidates fight to a draw. it is hard in that context to have a stunning victory or a terrible defeat. can you elaborate? >> the candidates spend a lot of time trying to lower their expectations about the performance and portray the other person as this great orator. in reality, the candidates spend a lot of time prepping for the debates and they are very good at it. they have read a lot of material and memorize a lot of material. in that context, it is hard for a candidate to really make a big enough mistake to actually swing opinion too strongly to his opponent. >>
cannot say it is not constitutional, i cannot afford it. michael melina a fascinating case. he is a glass cutter from redding, mass., working as grandparents firm. they only had a few employees, and typically, they will have somebody that works outside of the small business provide the coverage. if your husband is employed by a corporation, you would get the health insurance for the corporation. the small glass cutting firm did not provide health insurance. michael went to the state and said he had been on the health insurance connector, which was this new agency formed for people like him. if you do not get insurance through your company, you do not qualify for government programs. you could go on to the connector, which is like a shopping mall for various insurance programs. he said i have a wife that is out of work, a mortgage, condominium fees, a car payment -- he detailed his expenses, and he said he cannot afford the six ended $28 for my monthly health- insurance -- $620 for my monthly health-insurance premium. if the state said we think you can, and you should buy this program or t
and inexperience. >> reporter: in the next election, democratic candidate michael dukakis is asked this controversial question in his debate with vice president george bush. >> governor, if kitty dukakis were raped and murdered, would you favor an irrevocable death penalty for the killer? >> no, i don't, bernard, i think you know i oppose the death penalty during all of my life. >> reporter: the public sees his answer as cold and dispassionate. and that very night his poll numbers dropped. during the 1988 vice presidential debate, republican senator dan quayle's comparison of john f. kennedy elicits this blistering response from his opponent. >> senator, you're no jack kennedy. >> reporter: body language plays a part in the presidential debate in 1992, george h.w. bush deliberately looks at his watch and pays for it when the audience and voters see it as disrespectful. >> there are differences. >> reporter: body language makes a difference in a debate between al gore and george w. bush as well. gore sighs over and over again and bush surprises by winning the debate and the election
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

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